22. Policy on Sanctions
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The AC has the option, at any time, of investigating whether an accredited program may no longer be fully in compliance with the IAYT standards and policies. To this end, the AC may contact the program for information pertinent to any compliance concerns it may have and may arrange a meeting with school representatives to discuss its concerns.

In cases where the AC determines that a program has fallen out of compliance with one (1) or more IAYT standards and policies, it may apply a sanction. By applying a sanction, the AC informs the program that it must bring itself into compliance within a certain specified timeframe. The following are the three (3) sanctions the AC may apply; they are usually, although not always, applied sequentially, starting with a letter of advisement:

  1. Letter of Advisement. The Member School is formally advised by letter—sent to the school director and program director (or other representatives of the program)-of deficiencies or practices related to the IAYT standards and policies that could lead to a more serious sanction if not corrected expeditiously. The letter requests a focused report by a specific date, generally not to exceed six (6) months from the date of the letter (although the AC has discretion to specify a longer timeframe), that presents information on the steps the school has taken to address the deficiencies. The AC does not make public the fact that it has issued of a letter of advisement.

  2. Probation. If the Member School fails to respond satisfactorily to a letter of advisement or continues to be non-compliant with accreditation standards or policies, it may be placed on probation for its yoga therapy training program, which is a public sanction. A formal letter is sent to the school director and program director (or equivalent leadership positions), with a copy to the chair of the school's governing board, if applicable, setting forth the deficiencies upon which the probation is based. The letter requests submission of a focused report and, optionally, an onsite visit by representatives of the AC by a specific date, generally not to exceed six (6) months from the date of the letter (although the AC has discretion to specify a longer timeframe).

  3. Show Cause. If a Member School fails to correct the deficiencies or practices that resulted in probation, does not respond to a letter of advisement, or is found otherwise to have strongly deviated from the accreditation standards or policies, it may be requested to show why accreditation for its yoga therapy training program should not be withdrawn at the end of a stated period. The request to show cause is made by formal letter to the school director and program director (or equivalent leadership positions), with a copy to the chair of the school’s governing board, if applicable. The burden of proof is on the school to demonstrate to the AC why accreditation of its yoga therapy training program should be continued beyond the stated period. The letter sets forth the deficiencies upon which the show-cause action is based, specifies the show-cause period, and requests submission of a focused report and, optionally, an onsite visit by a specific date. The issuance of a show-cause letter is a public sanction. 

The AC judges the nature and severity of the situation in determining whether to issue a letter of advisement, impose probation, or issue a show-cause letter. While the three (3) sanctions are of increasing severity, they are not necessarily applied in sequence. The AC may apply any sanction at any time, with the requirement that the program correct the cited deficiency or circumstance within a stated period, not to exceed one (1) year. If multiple sanctions are imposed on a school with an accredited program, the total time that the school has to satisfactorily address the sanctions may not exceed two (2) years from the imposition of the first sanction. Accreditation status continues during a period of a sanction. As noted above, while a letter of advisement is not made public, the actions of probation and show cause are published. The school with an accredited program is responsible for any costs associated with a sanction.

The AC also has the authority to impose a sanction in the context of a hearing on reaffirmation of accreditation. In this case, the AC may, but is not required, to provide notice of its intended action. Should the AC consider placing a school with an accredited program on probation or issuing a show cause letter outside of the context of an accreditation action, it will: (i) inform the school of the sanction it intends to impose and the deficiencies or circumstances upon which the sanction is being considered, and (ii) provide the school an opportunity to submit a written response at least 15 days prior to date of meeting. In the event that a school's non-compliance with the IAYT's standards and policies poses potential immediate serious harm to students or others, the AC may forgo notification to the school or provide a shorter notice period. Within ten (10) business days of imposing a sanction the AC gives the school written reasons for its action. A school may not appeal a decision by the AC to impose a sanction, as a sanction is not considered an adverse decision 

Revocation of Accreditation

At the end of the time period stated in a show-cause letter, the AC will revoke the accreditation of a program that has not corrected to the satisfaction of the AC the deficiencies or circumstances that led to the issuance of the letter. At least 30 days before the meeting date on which the AC will decide whether to revoke accreditation based on the circumstances or deficiencies identified in the show cause letter, it will: (i) inform the school of its intended action, and (ii) provide the school an opportunity to submit a written response at least 15 days prior to date of meeting.

If a school or its program is found by a judicial court, or a federal or state agency, to have engaged in fraudulent activity, or if the school loses its authority to operate, the AC will withdraw accreditation. In such cases, the AC’s procedures for sanctions do not apply, and the terms and conditions set forth in a letter of advisement, a probation decision, or a show-cause letter that the AC may have issued are nullified.

A school that has accreditation of its yoga therapy training program revoked is not entitled to a refund of any fees or dues it has paid to the IAYT.A school interested in regaining accreditation must wait at least one (1) year from the time accreditation of its yoga therapy training program is revoked to apply for accreditation.