DRL - Yoga in Persons with Parkinson's Disease
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Yoga in Persons with Parkinson's Disease
Bryan Coleman
Salgado DPT
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SYTAR poster72x36.pdf 792 KB
ColemanSalgadoEffectofyogainIndividualswithParkinsons.pdf 53 KB
SYTAR5Mar08.pdf 1,780 KB

Topics

Resource Type:

- Human Systems and Common Ailments Conference Materials

Types of Systems and Ailments

Group:

- Nervous System All Groups
- Mental and Emotional Health

Created:

Methodology

03/20/2008
-Ananda

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File Content: SYTAR poster72x36.pdf

File Content: SYTAR5Mar08.pdf

File Content: ColemanSalgado EffectofyogainIndividualswithParkinsons.pdf




Effect of an eight-week adaptive yoga program on mobility, function, and outlook in individuals with Parkinson’s Disease. L Boulgarides DPT, B Coleman Salgado DPT, E Barakatt PhD, D Choo, M El-Zahr, K Williams, A Morales, Dept of Physical Therapy, CSU Sacramento BACKGROUND: Yoga has been found to be effective in addressing problems of strength, flexibility, balance, gait, anxiety, depression, and concentration. These problems are all present to varying degrees in individuals with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Different forms of exercise and therapy have been found to improve the symptoms related to PD, but no experimental studies have been found exploring the effects of a Yoga program on those symptoms. OBJECTIVE: Determine the effect on strength, ROM, balance, gait, depression and anxiety after 8 weeks of participation in an adaptive Yoga class in people with PD. METHODS: Approval was obtained from the CSUS Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects. Ten (n=10) subjects with PD (Hoehn & Yahr Stage 4 or less) were recruited for a one-way repeated measures design. Subjects were evaluated the first time, passed 8 weeks with no change in usual activity, were evaluated the second time, participated in an 8-week adaptive Yoga program, and were reevaluated a third time. The adapted Yoga program was developed in collaboration with a neurologic rehab physical therapist, and taught by a Certified Yoga Instructor. The program included breathing techniques, relaxation, meditation, and poses. Poses had potential to improve alignment, flexibility, balance, strength, and motor control. Outcome measures included: Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the anxiety and depression measures of the HADS, the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Modified Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), the 30 second chair stand, hamstring length tests (Sit and Reach), and shoulder/upper back flexibility (Apley’s Scratch Test). RESULTS: Differences between measures, initial measures, measures after the control phase, and measures after the intervention phase were done using one-way ANOVA with follow-up t-Tests and Friedman’s two-way ANOVA by ranks with follow up Wilcoxin Signed-Ranks Test. Analysis revealed the following measures reached or approached significant improvement after intervention: the Modified DGI (p = 0.15), BBS (p = 0.24), HADS (p = 0.06), Depression Measure of HADS (p = 0.002), 30 Second Chair Stand (p = 0.03), and Sit and Reach (p = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Changes in measures of strength, ROM, mobility, gait, balance and psychological health indicate a positive effect of Yoga for people with Parkinson’s Disease supporting further study using randomized controlled research design with more subjects.


EFFECT OF AN EIGHT-WEEK ADAPTIVE YOGA PROGRAM ON MOBILITY, FUNCTION, AND OUTLOOK IN INDIVIDUALS WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE Lois Boulgarides, PT, DPT, MS; Bryan Coleman-Salgado, PT, DPT, MS; Edward Barakatt, PT, PhD; Danette Choo, SPT; Michelline El-Zahr, SPT; April Morales, SPT; Kristi Williams, SPT Departments of Kinesiology and Physical Therapy, California State University, Sacramento Introduction Methods Analysis/Results Conclusions Purpose:Determine the effect on strength, ROM, balance, gait, depression and anxiety of an 8 week adaptive Yoga class in people with Parkinson’s Disease Analysis:Difference between initial measures, measures after the control phase, and measures after the intervention phase were calculated using one-way ANOVA with follow-up T-Tests and Friedman’s two-way ANOVA by ranks with follow up Wilcoxin Signed-Ranks Test. Results: Measures reaching or approaching significant improvement after intervention: •Modified DGI (p = 0.15), •BBS (p = 0.24), •HADS (p = 0.06), •Depression Measure of HADS (p = 0.002), •30 Second Chair Stand (p=0.03) •Sit and Reach (p=0.02) Subjects: •10 subjects with PD •Volunteers from Parkinson’s Assoc. of Northern CA •Hoehn & Yahr score <3 Methods and Procedures: One-way repeated measures design: •Evaluation #1 •8 weeks of no activity change •Evaluation #2 •8-week of participation in Yoga program •Evaluation #3 Adaptive Yoga Program: •Breathing Techniques •Relaxation •Meditation •Poses (floor, seated, and standing) Poses could potentially improve •Alignment, •Flexibility, •Balance, •Strength •Motor control Outcome Measures: •Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) •Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), •Anxiety and depression measures of the HADS, •Berg Balance Scale (BBS) •Modified Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) •30 second chair stand •Sit and Reach (flexibility) •Appley’s Back Scratch Test (flexibility) Change in measures of strength, ROM, mobility, gait, balance and psychological health in this pilot study indicate a positive effect of Yoga for people with Parkinson’s Disease. Background; Yoga has been found to be effective in addressing problems of strength, flexibility, balance, gait, anxiety, depression, and concentration, problems present in individuals with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Different forms of exercise and therapy have been found to improve the symptoms related to PD, but no experimental studies have been found exploring the effects of a Yoga program on those symptoms. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 5.8 (1.8) 6.0 (2.4) 4.1 (2.4) HADS Depression Scale Error Bars 95% CI; p = 0.03; p (3–2) = 0.002 Eval 3 Eval 1 Eval 2 Randomized clinical trials and use of a larger sample size are recommended to confirm the trends found in this pilot study. Future studies should explore the effects of a longer Yoga intervention and the effects of various adaptations of the Yoga program for individuals with Parkinson’s Disease. 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 9.6 (1.8) 10.2 (2.2) 11.6 (2.6) 30 Second Chair Stand Error Bars 95% CI; p = 0.03; p (3–2) = 0.03 Eval 3 Eval 1 Eval 2


Effect of an Eight-Week Adaptive Yoga Program on Mobility, Function, and Outlook in Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease Bryan Coleman Salgado, PT, DPT, MS, CWS Lois Boulgarides, PT, DPT, MS Edward Barakatt, PT, PhD Janice Freeman-Bell, RYT Danett Choo, SPT Michelline El-Zahr, SPT Kristi Williams, SPT April Morales, SPT SYTAR 2008 §Los Angeles